The Blog Propellant · writing

TBP New Prompt #6- Peter Altenberg



Peter collected his mail and took a table at Café Central by himself, away from the ghosts of his friends: Kraus, von Hofmannsthal, Klimt, and the others. He plopped down on the cushioned bench beneath the window. As was the norm, his pockets were empty, his stomach was too, but that didn’t matter. He fully intended to pen some prose today, some poetry. Armed with his inkpot, his quill, and an armful of correspondenzkarten on which to write (because he thrived on the limitations that they imposed on his writing); he selected one and scribbled on the back:

“Ich habe zu meinen zahlreichen unglücklichen Lieben noch eine neue hinzubekommen

den Schnee! Er erfüllt mich mit Enthusiasmus, mit Melancholie.” *


*Excerpt from „ WINTER AUF DEM SEMMERING “, Written by Peter Altenberg, master of the aphorism, first published in 1913.

I chose to steal this, and use it as the verse for my Haibun.



Written for The New Blog Propellant Prompt #6

The prompt directed me to choose an image. I chose this one:

write an ekphrastic poem
write an ekphrastic poem

The Blog Propellant · writing

TBP New Prompt #5- Kids Today



mini-tbp
TBP

 

I was in High School when I met Krissy (with a K) at a taco stand on night in El Paso. Me, Stevie, and Mike were out cruising in Stevie’s 1959 Cadillac convertible. It was a long, powerful automobile that was good for attracting chicks.

Krissy and her two friends didn’t require much prompting to crawl into the Caddy with us for a cruise downtown. Krissy came with a fat bomber, the size of her middle finger and I was pleased that she chose to sit in the back seat with me. On the way downtown we drank, smoked Krissy’s fattie, rolled up some Mexican weed so we could keep partying, and, most importantly, we stopped at the Piggly Wiggly on Montana where we bought a package or Oreos to stave off the munchies. I learned that night that Krissy could easily fit three whole Oreos into her mouth at one time.

Eventually we wound up near the University and lied our way into a Frat party. My smart mouth very nearly got us all into a fight but fortunately, my adversary developed a sense of humour at the last minute and we escaped.

The years have passed and been kind. Krissy and I have two high school aged children of our own. I don’t understand the kids today. They are not at all like their mother and I were. They’d rather play video games than throw up and hallucinate. I can’t figure it out. Can you?



Written for The New Blog Propellant Prompt #5

The prompt:

Use the theme “prompt,” or one of its synonyms to create a story or poem
(Some synonyms: incite, arouse, cause, convince, elicit…)


The Blog Propellant · writing

TBP New Prompt #4- More Inspiration than Aspiration



TBP

 

animals

a well-turned phrase

anyone who does, or has done, something well

beautiful days

artists

beautiful girls

bravery

blank canvas

breezes

colour palettes

clouds

colours

a well prepared meal

a near miss

a well-turned ankle

could be any given situation

community

dogs

generosity

farmers

goals achieved (my own, or my loved ones, or friends)

children

charity

chivalry

health

having the right tool

honesty

ideas

ideas

kindness

mountains

manners

nature

notebooks

northern lights

paintings

perseverance

passing trains

photos

poems

plans that works as they should

poets

San Francisco

rodeos

science

libraries

language

machinery that works and works well

selflessness

sculpture

sharing

something almost heard

smiles

something almost seen

sometimes a drink

something almost understood

song birds

southern cross

song writers

stars

storytellers

stories

talent

the golden gate bridge

the arctic

the purr of a mountain lion

theatre

the sea

understanding

words

well-honed knife’s edge

writers

writing implements



The prompt:

“Inspiration,” in English has had the meaning “the drawing of air into the lungs” since the middle of the 16th century. This breathing sense is still in common use among doctors, as is “expiration”…However, before “inspiration” was used to refer to breath it had a distinctly theological meaning in English, referring to a divine influence upon a person. The sense of inspiration often found today (“someone or something that inspires”) is considerably newer than either of these two senses, dating from the 19th century. (from Merriam-Webster.com)

Author’s note:

aspiration? Hmm…